Thursday, December 19, 2013

2013 Year-End Update

In October we celebrated F2’s first birthday and took the time to review the framework’s first year. In a blog post, we wrote how in the past year the F2 community has grown to include some of the financial industry’s biggest firms. Led by F2 Advisory Board members, these firms are demanding websites that are fast, versatile and built upon standards and open-source technology. Additionally, the growing F2 team continues to work hard to ensure that the framework is easy for technology teams to adopt, simple for developers to implement, and modern for today’s savvy users.

Now, at end of the year, we’re taking a few moments to review and evaluate before identifying goals for 2014. For the F2 initiative—one involving so many firms across the financial industry—this is imperative for the continued evolution of the framework.

2013 was busy on many fronts. When F2 launched, Markit On Demand was the only firm using the framework to accomplish simpler integration with its clients. Today more than 20 financial services firms have deployed F2-enabled solutions. Beyond simply using F2, many of the firms are contributing to the evolution of the standard as well.

On the topic of outreach, we would be remiss not to mention the inaugural F2 Hackathon held in April when Markit On Demand invited the F2 Advisory Board firms to its Boulder, Colorado campus to participate in this all-day event. More recently the F2 team attended two technology events in New York City. Representatives visited Finovate and the FinTech Hackathon to network with industry peers and hack on innovative ideas.

Looking through a microscope at the changes this past year, the following is F2 by-the-numbers (updated since October):

  • Released 14 versions of F2—the latest is 1.3.2.
  • Committed 902 source code revisions on GitHub
  • Opened 147 Issues on GitHub based on community feedback
  • Code additions and deletions totaling 1.2 million lines of code or documentation
  • Added CDN support for F2.js
  • 15,000+ people have visited OpenF2.org, with over 43,000+ total page views
  • The number of firms on the F2 Advisory Board grew to 13

Reading this you might be asking, “How many F2 apps have been built?” We estimate that number to be approximately 2,500. It’s difficult to pinpoint an exact count, due to the fact many of these are within private Containers. Of those, nearly 800 were built by Markit On Demand as part of custom solutions for its clients.

We see the industry’s acceptance of the F2 framework and the continued momentum behind the initiative as evidence of initial success. It would be foolish, of course, to sit back and rest on F2’s laurels. Instead, we’re planning on just the opposite.

Some of the goals we’ve set for F2 in 2014 include:

  • a complete redesign of OpenF2.org and its accompanying documentation
  • a proposed version two implementation of F2.js featuring RequireJS at its core
  • additions to the F2 specification for Data Apps and Identity Services
  • a closer look at strategic plans for the F2 Registry and Developer Center
  • a second F2 Hackathon and some informal workshops
  • continued outreach at fintech conferences and with industry peers

In time we will update the F2 roadmap on GitHub to include all of the details.

While F2 is young, it’s growing up fast. As we wrote in October, if the previous twelve months are any indication, the next twelve should be just as exciting. We’ve said all along that the greater the participation in F2 the richer, smarter and more effective it will be as an industry-wide platform to help reduce labor, time to market and costs. Thank you for being part of the open F2 initiative and contributing to a successful 2013.

Monday, November 18, 2013

F2 version 1.3.2

Today we are announcing the release of F2 version 1.3.2.  This is a patch release which fixes two bugs that can be viewed in the changelog and also below.

Any questions, concerns, or bug reports, submit an Issue on GitHub. Version 1.3.2 is available for download (zip) from GitHub.

Change Log

  • #143 - F2.log reports '{{sdk.version}}'
  • #145 - IE10 resolves scripts before they're loaded

Monday, October 28, 2013

F2 at the FinTech Hackathon

Next Saturday and Sunday F2 representatives from Markit and Markit On Demand (MOD) will be attending the FinTech Hackathon event in New York City. The two-day event features some of the best and brightest designers and developers from financial services firms competing to build innovative solutions. MOD is participating as a Technology Partner and is offering a Raspberry Pi and Pebble Watch for best use of its APIs. We will be using the opportunity to discuss F2 and how developers can leverage the framework to deploy more F2 apps in more places. In addition, we'll be competing ourselves to create an F2-enabled solution using an inventive blend of Tech Partner APIs.

If you, your colleagues or friends will be in NYC Nov 9-10, sign up for the event—it’s at MongoDB headquarters and only costs $20 to register.

See you there!

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

F2 Turns One!

Happy birthday, F2!

One year ago yesterday we launched F2 and introduced to the financial services community a brand-new way of integrating tools and content from multiple providers into a single, seamlessly integrated front-end. Since last October, the F2 community has grown to include some of the financial industry’s biggest firms. Led by F2 Advisory Board members, these participating firms are demanding websites that are fast, versatile and built upon standards and open-source technology. Being efficient, iterating quickly, reducing time to market as well as complexity without compromising security are no longer dreams of product and technology owners; they are facts of life. The growing F2 team at Markit On Demand (MOD) continues to work hard to ensure the framework is easy for technology teams to adopt, simple for developers to follow, and modern for today’s savvy and demanding users.

These past twelve months have been very busy on many fronts. When F2 launched MOD were the only ones using the framework. Today between fifteen and twenty financial services firms have deployed F2-enabled solutions. Beyond simply using it, many of them are contributing to the evolution of the standard as well. The roadmap has seen eight revisions. One hundred forty-one Issues have been opened based on community feedback. F2 was initially released under the terms of the MIT license before switching to the Apache license in version 1.2. This change affords better protections to those working on centralized and contributed open source code. In short, we’ve made a lot of progress.

Here is F2 by the numbers to-date:

  • We’ve released fourteen versions of F2, the latest, 1.3.1, yesterday.
  • We’ve closed 120 GitHub Issues.
  • We’ve committed 893 source code revisions on GitHub.
  • Code additions and deletions total 643,000 and 467,000, respectively.
  • The F2 Advisory Board firms shrunk by one then grew by two.
  • More than 13,000 people have visited OpenF2.org leading to 40,000 page views. Impressive for a 24-page website.
  • Nine of the eleven F2 Advisory Board firms traveled to Boulder in April for the inaugural F2 hackathon.

Looking broadly at F2 use, many have come to realize that by shifting development efforts towards a common specification that allows for complete customization, everyone wins. Information providers, content owners, financial firms, media outlets, developers and technology owners alike.

In the beginning we didn’t know whether F2 was going to be successful or not. As a result, we deemed it an experiment of sorts. Given where the framework is today, I think it’s safe to say it has been a success. And we’re working very hard to ensure it remains one. F2 has recently moved into the purview of MOD/L which doesn’t change who is working on it or how it’s maintained. The organizational move simply affords F2 the attention it demands and gives everyone the comfort in knowing they’re not adopting a dying standard.

While F2 is young, it’s growing up fast. Version 1.4 is scheduled for release in late Q4. We’re working hard on a proposed version two implementation alongside a complete redesign of OpenF2.org and its accompanying documentation. Discussions are beginning around a second F2 hackathon. We have F2 team members going to fin-tech conferences to evangelize and learn from what others are doing. The list goes on.

If the previous twelve months are any indication, the next twelve should be just as exciting. Thank you to everyone who has contributed to F2's success over the past year. Without the efforts of the F2 community, we wouldn’t have had much to write about today. We’ve said all along that the greater the participation in F2 the richer, smarter and more effective it will be as an industry-wide platform to help reduce labor, time to market and costs. Thanks to the community this is more true than ever.

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

F2 version 1.3.1

Today we are happy to announce version 1.3.1 of F2. This is a minor release adding only one new feature to F2's javascript SDK and a handful of documentation revisions. The single addition to F2.js is a new published event when apps fail to load. Issue #108 has all the details.

Please review the changelog for the complete list of updates in 1.3.1. You can also review pull request #138 and all closed Issues associated with the 1.3.1 milestone.

Any questions, concerns, or bug reports, submit an Issue on GitHub. Version 1.3.1 is available for download (zip) from GitHub.

Issue #141 is tracking the update of F2 on cdnjs.com.

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

An update on using AMD in F2

Since we originally posted this at the end of August, we've had a lot of discussion (41 comments, to be exact) on the topic of AMD in F2. I wanted to provide an update to say the conversation in #125 has slowed down while we shift focus over to #129—a more appropriate and longer-term resolution than originally envisioned. Head over to GitHub to join the discussion!

Monday, September 16, 2013

F2 1.3 Released

The F2 Team is excited to announce the immediate availability of F2 version 1.3. This release addresses a half-dozen Issues with F2.js.

The most notable update (warranting the version number change) is discussed in #124. In short, we replaced F2's internal loader for app javascript dependencies with age-old javascript instead of relying on jQuery. The replacement should be viewed as a "silent update" with no direct or indirect impact to Container or App Developers.

Please review the changelog for the complete list of updates in 1.3.0. You can also review pull request #130 and all closed Issues associated with the 1.3.0 milestone.

Any questions, concerns, or bug reports, submit an Issue on GitHub. Version 1.3.0 is available for download (zip) from GitHub.

Update: #137 is tracking the update of F2 on cdnjs.com. F2 1.3.0 is now available on cdnjs.

Update 2: The F2 1.3.0 NuGet package has been uploaded to the NuGet Gallery.

Friday, September 6, 2013

Minor F2 roadmap updates

We introduced some minor roadmap updates today. The changes include adjusting forward-looking minor version numbers based on SemVer, and revising the pull request number (#130) for version 1.3.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

F2 now on cdnjs

On the truly global Internet, use of a CDN is one smart way to boost performance on a web or mobile application. Two popular code hosting libraries are provided by Google and Microsoft while a third—cdnjs—is gaining popularity for its support of http, https and spdy covering dozens of javascript libraries.

The cdnjs network is powered by CloudFlare which is operating out of 23 data centers globally.


Starting with F2 version 1.2.1 developers can use F2.js hosted on cdnjs.

F2 1.2.1
//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/F2/1.2.1/f2.js
//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/F2/1.2.1/f2.min.js
F2 1.2.1 Packages
//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/F2/1.2.1/f2.basic.min.js
//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/F2/1.2.1/f2.no-bootstrap.min.js
//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/F2/1.2.1/f2.no-easyXDM.min.js
//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/F2/1.2.1/f2.no-jquery-or-bootstrap.min.js

Friday, August 30, 2013

Using AMD in F2

We've formally started the process of exploring the use of AMD in F2. Swing by GitHub and join the discussion on #125 and the amd-plugin branch.

Thursday, August 8, 2013

F2 1.2.1 Released

We are happy to share the news that we've stamped out a minor release of F2. This latest version, 1.2.1, includes 37 commits and resolves a half dozen issues.

The most notable change is the addition of F2.js packages. Packages are variants of F2.js. They are ideally used when, for example, a container already has jQuery or sandboxed apps aren't needed. In circumstances where not all F2 features are required, Container Providers can use smaller, faster, lighter-weight versions of F2.js. The smallest and most basic version of F2 is only 7.4kb. For more information, browse to the Docs.

Please review the changelog for the complete list of updates in 1.2.1. You can also review pull request #109 and all closed Issues associated with the 1.2.1 milestone.

Any questions, concerns, or bug reports, submit an Issue on GitHub. Version 1.2.1 is available for download (zip) from GitHub.

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Sneak Peak: Dev Center Teams

We're hard at work on the new Teams feature in the F2 Dev Center. Here's a sneak peak at an early screen.


Let us know if you have any feedback or ideas!

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Releases

GitHub recently launched a new addition to their suite of workflow tools, Releases. Not only does this seem like a great way to manage version control for projects but it also provides an immediate signal for developers seeking the latest version of your code vs. what's pre-release. Not everyone treats master equally.

We just back-published some Releases so our GitHub repository shows what's going on with F2.

Check it out:

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Custom Packages

We all want some form of customization in our web projects and, in many cases, customization is crucial to the success of an application. Today we're announcing F2 version 1.2.1 will not only provide developers the ability to create custom packages of the F2.js SDK but also include four pre-compiled copies of F2.

In providing AMD support for v1.1, we bundled jQuery and Bootstrap (modal) javascript into F2's closure. This move afforded Container Developers the ability of deploying F2 in any environment without worry about competing frameworks (i.e., jQuery vs Prototype JS). Additionally, this update kept F2's internal version of jQuery from leaking out to the window and conflicting with a different version of jQuery on the container. The biggest benefit was that F2 became instantly portable and (external) dependency-free. Developers simply had to include F2.js in a script tag and call F2.init().

Over the past couple of months, we've heard these features weren't always needed when building an F2-enabled web application. For example, if a container is already using a relatively new version of jQuery, F2 certainly didn't to include its own copy as well. If a Container Developer didn't need secure or sandboxed apps or wasn't using F2.UI, both the easyXDM and Bootstrap modal libraries could be excluded, too.

In F2 version 1.2, an all-new toolkit was introduced for developers, and one of the additions was the use of Grunt to build the framework. Grunt is a Node.js-based task runner for automating development processes such as combining, minifying, testing, js linting or copying files. Since Grunt makes it simple, adding 4 new packages was as easy as defining which files to concatenate and compress. Developers can clone the F2 repo and now define their own packages, too. We'll save all the details for the documentation updates coming in 1.2.1. In the meantime, a preview of just one of the four packages is the most basic version of F2 developers can get their hands on. F2.basic.js is a tiny 7.4kb (minified and gzipped) and offers a 27kb reduction in file size while maintaining 90% of the API coverage.

Keep an eye on the pull request tracking comments and commits for 1.2.1 and let us know if you have any feedback.

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Upgrading and backward compatibility

We've added a new page on the wiki tracking deprecated features in F2. The timing is important because starting with version 1.2, three ContainerConfig properties have been retired. As F2 features and/or F2.js APIs are deprecated, we will attempt to give reasonable advance notice via any or all of the F2 communication channels including this blog. In addition, we will strive to ensure that backward compatibility will be maintained for at least one major version of F2. For example, if Feature X is deprecated in version 1.3, we will attempt to maintain backward compatibility until the next major release (version 2.0). F2 documentation will be updated accordingly to reflect any changes, and any conversation behind deprecated features or APIs will be publicly available on GitHub.

Check out the new wiki page today.

Friday, June 7, 2013

F2 version 1.2 released

The F2 Team is happy to announce the immediate availability of version 1.2. This constitutes a major release—221 commits!—and includes numerous feature enhancements, roadmap items, a simpler toolkit for contributing developers, and bug fixes.

Please review the changelog for the complete list of updates in 1.2. You can also review pull request #69 and all 21 closed Issues associated with the 1.2 milestone.

Any questions, concerns, or bug reports, submit an Issue on GitHub. Version 1.2 is available for download (zip) from GitHub.

Friday, April 26, 2013

First quarter update

In looking back at the first quarter of 2013, we are very excited to provide an update on the state of F2. These past few months have been very busy on many fronts and, in particular, the F2 community has grown to include some of the financial industry’s biggest firms. F2 launched in October 2012 and the F2 team in Boulder, CO continues to work hard to ensure the framework is easy for technology teams to adopt, simple for developers to follow, and modern for today’s savvy and demanding users. More than ever before, it is an open framework created for the financial services industry.

The latest version of F2 is 1.1 and was released two weeks ago. This dot release included numerous features and most notably support for AMD module loading with F2.js. Nearly everyone within the core F2 community asked for AMD compatibility. We listened and we’re not stopping with this latest version. Slated for release as part of 1.3 on our roadmap is much broader support for AMD inside F2. If you’re not familiar with the AMD (Asynchronous Module Definition) API, we encourage you to head over to requirejs.org to read more about this approach.

We continue to receive feedback from the F2 community and these recommendations are shaping the F2 roadmap. Up next for F2 is version 1.2 which includes some other hot-topic items such as an F2.js source map, F2 app sandboxing and more structure in Context messages.

The most significant additions to 1.2 are the Registry and new Developer Center. These two applications operate in tandem: the Registry is a MySQL-backed data store for F2 container and app configurations; the Developer Center is where F2 developers can manage those configurations, participate in the F2 community, find resources, stay in touch and more. We’ve just launched functioning beta versions of the Registry and Dev Center to a small group. Spec additions for the Registry and Developer Center are planned for end of Q2 as part of the F2 1.3 release.

While we’re on the topic of the framework, F2 on GitHub is continuing to be very active. Here is F2 by the numbers:

Commits to ‘master’ since project started 488
Commits to ‘master’ since October 15 123
Total issues closed 64
Versions released (milestones completed) 7
Current progress on F2 version 1.2 91 commits, 12 issues closed


On a different note, Markit On Demand invited the F2 Advisory Board firms to its Boulder, Colorado campus to participate in the inaugural F2 Hackathon on April 11th. This event was coupled with Markit On Demand’s quarterly Do What You Want Day and was a tremendous success. 9 of the 11 F2 Advisory Board firms met for a day of education, collaboration, coding and fun. The weather cooperated—as it often does in Colorado—for a food truck rodeo featuring Boulder’s finest meals on wheels. Thank you to all of the participants who came to hack with us!

One last formality to address as Q2 moves ahead. F2 was originally released under the MIT license. F2 will be switching to the Apache license as part of the 1.2 release. Why? Primarily, the Apache v2.0 license is a more robust and detailed license. It is an industry-wide accepted standard license which encourages collaboration amongst the software developer community. Unlike the MIT license, the Apache license provides that contributions to the licensed work, if accepted, are made with the express understanding that they will become part of the original, licensed work. Simply said, this is great news for F2 and the F2 community as the Apache license affords more protections around centralized and contributed open source code.

Thank you for being part of the open F2 initiative and contributing to a successful start to 2013. We look forward to seeing you on GitHub soon and follow us on Twitter @OpenF2.

Monday, April 8, 2013

F2 1.1.2 Released

F2 version 1.1.2 has arrived!  This update fixes a number of bugs and adds one major improvement to the GitHub repo: Continuous Integration.  You can see the list of resolved issues below and also in the changelog.

We're still working on the next 1.2 release and should have it out in the coming weeks.  You can check out the progress of that release on GitHub.

Change Log

  • #37 - Add CSS namespacing rules to spec for Container Developers
  • #43 - Investigate adding Continuous Integration
  • #44 - Inlines not evaled if a script is not included
  • #47 - Example app Chart: remove dependency on "$.browser"
  • #48 - Delegate events in HelloWorld example app
  • #54 - Example compare tool
  • #55 - Can't pass single AppManifest into F2.registerApps
  • #64 - Create tag for all stable releases when they are phased out.

Monday, March 18, 2013

F2 1.1.1 Released

The F2 Team is pleased to announce F2 version 1.1.1. This release addresses some cosmetic bugs that were reported after the 1.1 release. As always, you can check out the release notes in the changelog and also listed below.

We already have a number of items slated for the next 1.2 release. Thanks to everyone on GitHub who is collaborating and sculpting the future
of F2!

Change Log

  • #51 - Version number broken in 1.1
  • #52 - Bootstrap modals not minified

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Announcing F2 1.1

We are excited to announce the availability of F2 version 1.1. This is our most significant update to F2 since we launched last October and focuses largely on improvements to F2.js.

Of all the updates, one enhancement we'd like to specifically highlight is the newly-added support for loading F2.js as an AMD module (#25). Many of our users are asking for AMD support and this is the first step in that direction. We have written some baseline Jasmine tests and would welcome contributors to write more.

The release notes from the new F2 changelog are listed below.

  • Merging previously separate Specification and F2.js versions into simultaneous releases
  • Support for AMD module loading, #25
  • More unit tests for F2.js, following #23
  • Typos and other minor changes
  • Bug fixes

For full details along with the commit history, review pull request #36 and all Issues associated with the 1.1 milestone.

You can clone or download this latest version of F2 from GitHub today.

Friday, March 1, 2013

F2 Roadmap

We have assembled this roadmap largely based on feedback we've received from the F2 community. There are many components of the framework under constant development and, as a result, this roadmap is far from set-in-stone.

If you have anything you'd like to see added, removed or simply moved from one release to another, let us know.

Follow us on Twitter @OpenF2.

F2 1.1

  • This release is being tracked in pull request #36
  • Merging previously separate Specification and F2.js versions into simultaneous releases
  • Support for AMD module loading, #25
  • More unit tests for F2.js, following #23
  • Typos and other minor changes
  • Bug fixes

F2 1.2

  • Add source maps for F2.js, #28
  • Evaluate LightningJS, Caja, AdSafe, dojox.secure or similar for an added security layer for containers and apps through F2.js
  • Evaluate and design security model for passing Context, including targeted messaging to and from apps (targeting 1.3 release)
  • Implement structured Context message protocol based on FIX or OFX. We are currently planning on implementing FIX.
  • Registry, Registry API suite, and Developer Center BETA

F2 1.3

  • Registry, Registry API suite, and Developer Center out of BETA
  • By releasing the Registry, Registry API suite and Developer Center, significant changes include (but are not limited to):
    • Removals:
      • Current manual app integration process. Static AppConfigs will be available alongside dynamic AppConfigs... powered by the Registry.
      • Current AppId creation process. The new Developer Center will dictate the new process. (Yes, the AppId format will remain the same.)
    • Additions:
      • Developer Center processes for Container & App Developers, notably new app registration
      • Registry APIs & docs
      • Registry schema and procedures
      • Code samples
  • F2 ID web service
  • Update Context message structure spec (and code samples) to use FIX Protocol.
  • Add some of the most common FIX field types to the Docs and F2.js constants.
  • Refactor F2.js per #29 for broader AMD support. F2.js will leverage a compression technique similar to the RequireJS Optimizer rather than use an internal AMD loader.
  • Remove jQuery dependency in F2.js making library capable of running alongside frameworks such as jQuery, Dojo, ExtJS, PrototypeJS, etc. without any additional overhead. Tracking in #39.
  • Remove Twitter Bootstrap JavaScript dependency from F2.js.
  • Move F2.UI.Modals to a F2.js plugin (per the previous item).
  • Add Registry web services to F2.js internals for dynamic app integration for Container Developers.
  • Introduce targeted Context messaging to and from apps, and broader security model for F2 Containers
  • Add versioning, upgrading and compatibility instructions.
  • Add log levels within F2.log() (for INFO, WARN, ERROR)
  • More unit tests, following #23

F2 1.4

  • Expand, clarify and define boundaries and responsibilities for container & app entitlements. This means identifying who is responsible for entitling what and where at what level.
  • Add Container > App authentication recommendations to spec. This will not include how to authenticate but rather define requirements. For example, if you wanted to use the SAML protocol, the F2 specification will outline what steps you’d need to take to ensure your F2-enabled solution work with SAML.
  • Expand searchable universe of F2 IDs beyond global equities
  • Add F2 ID javascript plugin

F2 1.5

  • Evaluate building F2 adapters for proprietary frameworks
  • Add simpler legacy and secure app integration methods in F2.js (replacing current manual iframe injection)
  • Add more example apps to the project on GitHub and redesign example containers

Contributions to the Roadmap

This roadmap is very much a work in progress. Most of the items detailed within each release are a result of direct feedback from users of F2, and we'd like to keep it that way where possible. Our users are very important to us, and if you want to contribute to this roadmap, please feel free to reach out to us.

Contributions to this roadmap can be made by submitting an Issue on GitHub or by emailing info@openf2.org (we'll then make an Issue to track the request).

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Browser compatibility and coding standards

We added two new pages to our wiki on GitHub today: browser compatibility and coding standards.

The browser compatibility has been a long time coming and necessary for any web framework, it just took us a bit to test everything. While developing F2.js, it is an important goal of ours to ensure browser compatibility across the major (and minor) browsers. Of course, creating—and iterating on—a complex and modern web integration framework means taking a forward-thinking approach. As such, you may have noticed we're not officially supporting IE7 or below. This was an important and necessary choice for the F2 roadmap. If you're building a web app that needs to support IE7 and you're running into an issue with F2.js, reach out to us—we'll see what we can do to help.

The coding standards page has also been in the works for a while and is important for the folks contributing to F2. (Thank you!) Coding standards promote a common vocabulary and syntax so that our fellow developers can concentrate on what you're saying rather than on how you're saying it. The standards are based on Google's well-defined guidelines with a few exceptions, and they match the style guide we follow within our 110-person development team at Markit On Demand. If you're contributing to F2, please take a few minutes to become familiar with our coding standards.

Friday, February 1, 2013

New version of F2 and F2.js released

We've just released a series of minor changes to both the F2 specification and the F2.js SDK, versions 1.0.5 and 1.0.3, respectively.

The two changelogs in our wiki on GitHub have been updated with the specifics, and we encourage you to check them out. Any questions, comments, or issues—let us know!

Introducing an F2 blog

Hello! The F2 team is excited to announce the launch of our blog. Over the past few months, we've found that Twitter's 140-character limit just isn't enough for what we want to write about, so we're expanding our horizons.

You simply can't have an open source project without having a blog to discuss it, where it has been and where it's headed. We'll (attempt to) keep you engaged by discussing the architecture of a web framework for the financial industry, the decisions we are making along with the community's feedback, and some of the challenges all of us are faced with every day when building complex, multi-vendor, multi-channel web-based solutions.

Thanks for stopping by and stay tuned.